Scientific american mind online dating

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Well, several experiments have shown that when shoppers are presented with either an extensive or limited amount of potential consumer choices (e.g.

chocolates, jam flavors) more people actually end up making purchases, and are happier, when the choice environment only offers a limited set of options.

When the little buzzer went off after three minutes, I was (typically) still in the process of trying to explain to my bedazzled dating partner why my last name has three syllables (it’s Dutch).

As you can imagine, I did not find the love of my life.

Similar evidence is found in other non-human animals.In particular, people tend to assume that it is always a good thing to think long and hard about everything, consciously deliberating different potential outcomes and rationally weighing different pros and cons.However, an emerging field of research is questioning this traditional view.Alison Lenton and Marco Francesconi recently published an article in the in which they analyzed over 3,700 human dating decisions across 84 speed-dating events.The authors found that when the available dates varied more in attributes such as age, height, occupation and educational background, people made fewer dating proposals.Similarly, another study showed that when German students were asked to evaluate pairs of American colleges, the German students predicted their relative ranking with better accuracy than their American peers (based solely on their recognition of the university’s name).

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